[Sober Living] In Ten Years III

In ten years, how will sobriety look? Not just mine, but our scientific understanding of addiction? We have antidepressants, anti-anxieties, antipsychotics, and SSRIs to potentially destroy our free-will to dampen our emotions. How about something less extreme? Will we have a pill addressing only the physical reactions to stress… possibly causing addiction? Will stories of insobriety still weigh me, and everyone, down? Will polite society become more accepting? Will we see sobriety root cause analysis?

The biggest problem I see is that sobriety is still seen as sinful.

It’s uncouth in American and global society to talk about our problems. It took me months of deliberation before I finally said fuck it and wrote about “My Penultimate Trip.” The one event that shook me to my core and made me realize not only that I had a problem, but I had no idea what the hell was going on, and I’d need to make some serious changes in my life before I became consumed by something that could very well have made me flip out.

So I thought, as you do, “could I turn this into a screenplay?”

I drew that idea out on the paper that’s symbolically weighing down Dr. Mindbender above. The idea behind that and the Sober Living series is to externalize these experienced. If we all can express our experiences, openly and honestly, those expressions might be able to help those who can’t; those who are haunted by things they know aren’t real…

Everyone seems apprehensive about addressing even minor relations.

Most people I’ve met casually reference alcohol, sometimes cannabis, so they might see sobriety as more of a threat or apprehension point than something like lactose intolerance. Perhaps only subconsciously. These folks, good intentioned and all, might not want to associate with people outside the norm. It’s been easier for me to find conversation solace in fellow outsiders. We respect each other’s quirks and weird headspaces.

That’s why I’m putting more elements of myself out there.

The more people we have, yourself included, that go out there and say “yeah, I struggle with X” or “I don’t feel as confident over Y,” the more we can start to create realistic baselines for life. We can break down fundamental social assumptions. From there, we can build up more scientific evidence for what constitutes addiction, and ways to either mitigate or resolve the worst of those experiences for the most of us.

I’m not advocating for complete hedonism.

Everything in life can lead to addictive behavior, even writing like this. If I write too much, I can lose out on sleep, I can be late for prior obligations, and I can forgo other things in life. There’s this rare moon outside while I finish writing this. (It was too cloudy.) I could be possibly out there enjoying it and taking photographs. Would something as benign as that be considered addictive behavior? Taking pleasure in one thing over another?

That’s where we need more empirical research and data.

Sources: My own experiences

Quotes: None

Inspirations: My own experiences

Related: “My Penultimate Trip” and, really, “Expanding Medical Literature

My big goal is to write. My important goal is to write "The Story." My proudest moment is the most recent time I overcame a fear, which should have been today. I'm a better zombie than I was yesterday. Let's strive to be better everyday. (Avatar)