[The Story] Mother’s Day Moments

Mother’s Day for the Lanchester family is an important celebration. Like Father’s Day, and everyone’s birthday, it’s more than just an excuse for Trishna (left) to take photos of her newborn niece Alejandría (“Allie Pally”). It’s a time to reconnect, fortify long-term goals, work through any lingering problems that might need attention, and celebrate the matriarchal side of the family. Let’s explore how Mother’s Days might feel in the first few years of “The Story.”

Spoiler Warning Scale: Minor (hypotheticals, character development)
WANNA READ ABOUT SOME COOL MOMS AND POTENTIAL MOMS? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!

[Fiction Practice] We Drifted Apart

“Thanks for inviting me over, Sammohini. I’ve been wanting to talk to you one-on-one, well, with cute little Allie Pally here, too, for a while.”
Both childhood friends adjusted as the baby fussed, crawled out of the guest’s lap, and returning to her mother.
“It’s been too long! Right, huh? You haven’t seen Auntie Jane-y in a while? Have you?”
They both smiled. Jane wanted to smile, but there was too much on her mind.

WANNA READ ABOUT HOW FRIENDSHIP DYNAMICS MIGHT HELP US COPE WITH DRIFTING APART FROM OTHERS? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!

[The Story] Weak versus Weakness

We can decide whether our weaknesses will cause us to become weak. While most weaknesses can become excuses that can potentially control us, there are exceptions that should be respected. My intentions are pure, so let’s not focus on any possible hypotheticals for this week’s update to “The Story.” Instead, let’s focus on two casual examples of when main characters John (off-center) and Trishna (center) decide to not let their physical weaknesses make them weak.

Spoiler Warning Scale: Minor (character development) WANNA CONSIDER HOW WE’RE MORE CAPABLE THAN WE MIGHT INITIALLY THINK OURSELVES TO BE? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!

[Fiction Practice] The Gig Life VII

“I.T., this is Sam.”
“Sam, Tia. Got a weird one, but first, how’s your baby? Healthy?”
“She’s stoked to be over at my parents this week, thanks-”
“Sure. Occasionally seeing this since yesterday. Rebooted. Sent you photo. Says battery life: 6800 hours.”
“Huh. Well, does it hold a charge?”
“Yes, going bad?”
“Probably… I’ll email you the battery model. Expense it, send me the weird one, and let me know if it persists.”
“Sure, appreciated. Bye!”

WANNA READ ABOUT HOW THIS INTERACTION COULD PERMEATE INTO EVEN THE MOST FAMILIAL MOMENTS? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!