[The Story] Learning From Others

For as many complaints people unrequitedly say about their relationships, I only hear a few positive comments. I imagine that will also be true in “The Story,” where men will complain to John [right] and women will complain to Trishna [left] about their spouses. Maybe it’s easier to complain? Since the last essay focused on the negatives, below, let’s focus on the positives, because really the only difference is the intended outcome: progress or regress?

Spoilers?: Minor (just character brainstorming)
WANNA CONSIDER HOW WHAT WE HEAR WILL AFFECT HOW WE PRECEIVE REALITY? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!

[The Story] Couples on Buses

I’ve been writing and rewriting “The Story,” scene after stochastic scene, for as long as I can remember. An idea will pop up while I’m riding the bus, talking to someone, or reading a book. I’ll see a couple on the bus and think about John [left] and Trishna [right]. Better than stressing about work! In these situations, memories, or maybe more, I wonder: how much of “The Story” will be based on real people?

Spoilers?: Minor (fiction building musings)
WANNA CONSIDER HOW YOU COULD BE THE INSPIRATION FOR ELEMENTS OF SEVERAL DIFFERENT CHARACTERS IN ANY FICTIONAL WORK? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!

[The Story] Purpose of Birthdays

If there were one day of the year to practice healthy self-respect, it’d be your birthday. We continually sacrifice ourselves for others throughout the year. Why not reclaim our autonomy on our birthdays? Do what you enjoy doing most, do nothing, or do something ambitious! In “The Story,” Trishna [right] and her family have that attitude toward birthdays, so when John [left] has his first birthday as part of “the family,” it’s a culture shock.

Spoilers?: Minor (just character building)
WANNA CONSIDER THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN ARROGANCE AND CONFIDENCE IN REGARDS TO HOW YOU TREAT YOURSELF AND OTHERS ON YOUR BIRTHDAY? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!

[The Story] Cluttered Living Space

I don’t completely endorse the idea that settings are like characters. While someone’s workspace or personal space can convey surface-level symbolic meaning over personality, what is tolerable or not, and more, I don’t think it’s a comprehensive glimpse into a person’s, or character’s, mind. Still, in “The Story,” there are some key settings that could provide interesting anecdotal information into the minds of Trishna [left] and John [right]. Let’s declutter the psychology from the physical.

Spoilers?: Minor (set-building… as character-building?)
WANNA CONSIDER HOW THINKING TOO LITTLE OR TOO MUCH ABOUT SETTING CAN BE WASTEFUL? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!

[The Story] Shave and Bathe

Now that I’m writing bi-weekly updates to “The Story,” I dredged up an interesting realization: why not write about some of the scenes that float through my imagination? It’ll be good practice for the real thing! Throwing characters into hypothetical situations can help build context for how they’ll act in other scenes. Like a movie playing on repeat, what if these scenes are already swimming around in your imagination? Let’s start with an innocent one:

Spoilers?: Minor (rough scene walkthrough)
WANNA CONSIDER HOW THE MORE YOU WORK ON A PROJECT, THE MORE THE PROJECT GROWS SEEMINGLY BY ITSELF? THEN ISN’T IT A MATTER OF SHAVING THE EXCESS? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!

[The Story] Aspirations of Homesickness

How much would you sacrifice to make your aspirations possible? How important is your comfort? As we grow older, there’s a growing sense of wanting more from life. For Trishna (right), she wants to go to college to fulfill her dreams and become independently successful, well, along with John (left), yet part of that means leaving her retiring service dog Pollyanna (center) and family at home. How might that answer be addressed in “The Story?”

Spoiler Warning Scale: Minor (character exploration) WANNA CONSIDER HOW MUCH SACRIFICE THEY AND WE GIVE TO ACHIEVE OUR ASPIRATIONS? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!

[The Story] Mother’s Day Moments

Mother’s Day for the Lanchester family is an important celebration. Like Father’s Day, and everyone’s birthday, it’s more than just an excuse for Trishna (left) to take photos of her newborn niece Alejandría (“Allie Pally”). It’s a time to reconnect, fortify long-term goals, work through any lingering problems that might need attention, and celebrate the matriarchal side of the family. Let’s explore how Mother’s Days might feel in the first few years of “The Story.”

Spoiler Warning Scale: Minor (hypotheticals, character development)
WANNA READ ABOUT SOME COOL MOMS AND POTENTIAL MOMS? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!

[The Story] Our Most Vulnerable

No matter how much we mentally prepare for change, life can slip out of control instantly. “Tout passe [everything goes], tout lasse [everything tires], tout casse [everything breaks].[1]” The concept of “control” is a mental construct of our collective imagination that we dare wield to challenge The Great Unknown in a battle of normalcy over our chaotic reality. With only tangential relation, how might Trishna (center) and John (right) handle vulnerable moments in “The Story?”

Spoiler Warning Scale: Minor (some early events)
WANNA VICARIOUSLY EXPLORE WEAKNESS SO THAT WE MAY BECOME STRONGER? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!

[The Story] Entertaining Solo Hobbies

The introductory conflict of “The Story” is how two social outcasts, John (left) and Trishna (right), want to develop their relationship yet can’t due to geographic distance. It’s not spoiling this conflict to say they do meet, since this conflict is the narrative introduction deemed “The Scene,” and it’s a convenient inference. If their natural inclination then is spending all of their time together, after spending years physically apart, would they even have separate hobbies?

Spoiler Warning Scale: Minor (character development) WANNA CONSIDER HOW WE MIGHT OVERSATURATE OURSELVES BY SOAKING IN TOO MUCH OF ONE THING? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!

[Fiction Practice] Your Barnyard Animal?

The 5-person panel interview at the Department of Revenue was going ‘excellent’ and ‘alright’ simultaneously. Everyone flipped between either word for every answer. Jane was having trouble reading the expressions of the two potential teammates, hiring manager, and two customers when she heard the strangest interview question of her career: “If my team were a farm, what barnyard animal would you be, and why?” She’d brushed up on any applicable modern technology, but nothing agricultural.

WANNA READ THIS REAL-LIFE INTERVIEW QUESTION AND POSSIBLY HOW TO NAIL IT? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!