[Fiction Practice] Dreaming of Data

“Let me go ahead and make that ticket for you, just a moment, I just need to finish filling out the notes, and you can be on your way. The ticket number will also be in your email, in a few minutes, with a hyperlink where you can track the status at any time. OK, that ticket number is-“

Chirp, chirp.

The alarm clock read 03:35 AM. Time to wake up and actually go to work.

WANNA READ A MOSTLY-FICTIONALIZED ACCOUNT OF THE WORKING LIFE? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!

[The Story] Buying Their Farm II

“I didn’t take the farm because I didn’t want to work 24×7.” The setting for the Lanchester Farm, a key location in “The Story,” was admittedly inspired partially by farms in popular culture. The quaint aesthetics and hard working characters must have subconsciously appealed to me more than any familiar city setting. The reality is much more involved. Let’s plow through some highlights of my agriculture study notes to see how the farm may change.

Spoiler Warning Scale: None (just worldbuilding)
WANNA READ A LITTLE ABOUT FARMING BUT MAINLY ABOUT WRITING STRATEGY? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!

[The Story] Buying Their Farm I

The world of “The Story” can’t just anecdotally revolve around John and Trishna. Learning about related and peripheral characters can help enrich the overall narrative, especially as I start digging into details. Why do Trishna’s parents, Divit (left) and Brigit (right), own a farm? It’s hard work compared to our current digital work. Was it out of appeal? How much of it was out of necessity? Are farms even profitable in their world? Let’s explore.

Spoiler Warning Scale: None (just world-building… no fatalities) WANNA EXPLORE WHY CHARACTERS MIGHT BUY THE FARM TO LIVE IN PEACE? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!

[Fiction Practice] The Gig Life VII

“I.T., this is Sam.”
“Sam, Tia. Got a weird one, but first, how’s your baby? Healthy?”
“She’s stoked to be over at my parents this week, thanks-”
“Sure. Occasionally seeing this since yesterday. Rebooted. Sent you photo. Says battery life: 6800 hours.”
“Huh. Well, does it hold a charge?”
“Yes, going bad?”
“Probably… I’ll email you the battery model. Expense it, send me the weird one, and let me know if it persists.”
“Sure, appreciated. Bye!”

WANNA READ ABOUT HOW THIS INTERACTION COULD PERMEATE INTO EVEN THE MOST FAMILIAL MOMENTS? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!