[The Story] Mother’s Day Moments

Mother’s Day for the Lanchester family is an important celebration. Like Father’s Day, and everyone’s birthday, it’s more than just an excuse for Trishna (left) to take photos of her newborn niece Alejandría (“Allie Pally”). It’s a time to reconnect, fortify long-term goals, work through any lingering problems that might need attention, and celebrate the matriarchal side of the family. Let’s explore how Mother’s Days might feel in the first few years of “The Story.”

Spoiler Warning Scale: Minor (hypotheticals, character development)
WANNA READ ABOUT SOME COOL MOMS AND POTENTIAL MOMS? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!

[The Story] Entertaining Solo Hobbies

The introductory conflict of “The Story” is how two social outcasts, John (left) and Trishna (right), want to develop their relationship yet can’t due to geographic distance. It’s not spoiling this conflict to say they do meet, since this conflict is the narrative introduction deemed “The Scene,” and it’s a convenient inference. If their natural inclination then is spending all of their time together, after spending years physically apart, would they even have separate hobbies?

Spoiler Warning Scale: Minor (character development) WANNA CONSIDER HOW WE MIGHT OVERSATURATE OURSELVES BY SOAKING IN TOO MUCH OF ONE THING? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!

[The Story] Painting as Teamwork

While painting this inconsequential accent wall, I thought about how Trishna (left) and John (right) might paint in “The Story.” Trishna might lock her breaks, dip her roller with extension pole into a paint tray, paint one section, move, and repeat. John might then get the finer details along the corners. Since painting takes preparation, planning – and when working with others, teamwork, collaboration, and delegation of duties – how well would they handle any possible friction?

Spoiler Warning Scale: Minor (character development)
WANNA READ AN ACCIDENTALLY DEEP PSYCHOLOGICAL ANALYSIS PROMPTED FROM A RANDOM TASK? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!

[The Story] Weak versus Weakness

We can decide whether our weaknesses will cause us to become weak. While most weaknesses can become excuses that can potentially control us, there are exceptions that should be respected. My intentions are pure, so let’s not focus on any possible hypotheticals for this week’s update to “The Story.” Instead, let’s focus on two casual examples of when main characters John (off-center) and Trishna (center) decide to not let their physical weaknesses make them weak.

Spoiler Warning Scale: Minor (character development) WANNA CONSIDER HOW WE’RE MORE CAPABLE THAN WE MIGHT INITIALLY THINK OURSELVES TO BE? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!

[The Story] Buying Their Farm II

“I didn’t take the farm because I didn’t want to work 24×7.” The setting for the Lanchester Farm, a key location in “The Story,” was admittedly inspired partially by farms in popular culture. The quaint aesthetics and hard working characters must have subconsciously appealed to me more than any familiar city setting. The reality is much more involved. Let’s plow through some highlights of my agriculture study notes to see how the farm may change.

Spoiler Warning Scale: None (just worldbuilding)
WANNA READ A LITTLE ABOUT FARMING BUT MAINLY ABOUT WRITING STRATEGY? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!

[The Story] Buying Their Farm I

The world of “The Story” can’t just anecdotally revolve around John and Trishna. Learning about related and peripheral characters can help enrich the overall narrative, especially as I start digging into details. Why do Trishna’s parents, Divit (left) and Brigit (right), own a farm? It’s hard work compared to our current digital work. Was it out of appeal? How much of it was out of necessity? Are farms even profitable in their world? Let’s explore.

Spoiler Warning Scale: None (just world-building… no fatalities) WANNA EXPLORE WHY CHARACTERS MIGHT BUY THE FARM TO LIVE IN PEACE? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!

[Fiction Practice] The Gig Life VII

“I.T., this is Sam.”
“Sam, Tia. Got a weird one, but first, how’s your baby? Healthy?”
“She’s stoked to be over at my parents this week, thanks-”
“Sure. Occasionally seeing this since yesterday. Rebooted. Sent you photo. Says battery life: 6800 hours.”
“Huh. Well, does it hold a charge?”
“Yes, going bad?”
“Probably… I’ll email you the battery model. Expense it, send me the weird one, and let me know if it persists.”
“Sure, appreciated. Bye!”

WANNA READ ABOUT HOW THIS INTERACTION COULD PERMEATE INTO EVEN THE MOST FAMILIAL MOMENTS? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!

[The Story] Holidays at Lanchesters

The Story,” my ambitious project that permeates everything I do, has holidays similar to modern Americana. Let’s consider their biggest winter holiday: most everyone in Trishna’s extended family meets at her parents’s place, the Lanchester farm, for a day or so of festivities and socializing. This is also John’s first holiday with the family, and perhaps first big holiday gathering, since his childhood years were spent neglected or ignored. Let’s focus on the positive festivities:

Spoiler Warning Scale: Minor (first year narrative and world building)
WANNA SEE WORLD BUILDING AND FAMILY DYNAMICS OF THE MAIN CHARACTERS OF THE STORY? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!

[The Story] Don’t Hurt Her

This scene in “The Story” concluded a recent float tank session like a vague memory from a life I never lived. Shortly after John (right) arrives at Trishna’s family farm, her father Divit (center) has “the chat” he has with anyone that is considering becoming close friends with any of his daughters or sons. Let’s explore how I’m building this scene, so once I write it formally, it will have the appropriate emotion and resonance.

Spoiler Warning Scale: Minor (scene-building)
WANNA SEE HOW I’M TACKLING ONE OF THE CORNERSTONE SCENES OF THE STORY? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!

[The Story] “Please Stay Safe”

The Story” will mainly tell the story of two characters: John (left) and Trishna (center). During a summer they spend together on Trishna’s family farm before heading off to college, after years of chatting exclusively online with the occasional phone call, they learn about each other and the world. They’ll talk with her parents Divit (center) and Brigit (right) about these topics, in passing, cemented with one serious conversation that should help them stay safe.

Spoiler Warning Scale: Minor (backstory and worldbuilding)
WANNA SEE THE BRAINSTORMING BEHIND THE BIG TALK? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!