[Applied Psychology] Handling Crazy Encounters

The disheveled cosplayer clamored about being hungry and found a chair inside the booth, swearing at nobody and engaging with anybody. “He must be on something!” While that was the weirdest event from Sakura-Con, I don’t want to be judgemental. We should try to help others. It’s important to determine when psychological issues others display are harmless or harmful, then act appropriately. I’ve summarized potential options both in this photo and in the full article.

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[Applied Psychology] Overcoming Bad News

The best way to overcome bad news is to sit down with the problem, brainstorm myriad possible solutions, and try some out. The scientific method, basically. It’s just too bad that doesn’t usually happen, since as human beings full of conflicting emotions that almost actively reject logic and reason, we tend to get so hung up on that one problem that it permeates every facet of our lives preventing us from shifting gears into solution mode. Why?

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[Applied Psychology] Playing Dress Up

If you want to study human psychology, start with dogs. Imagine psychology as a series of if-then-else patterns, where you say or do something to a human they might react in hundreds of different ways and dogs might just have a handful. So when we dressed up my childhood dog Patrick in an old shirt and he looked particularly happy, that wasn’t just him smiling for the camera.

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[Applied Psychology] Understanding Our Mortality

There’s a poignant moment in a video about Smiley, an aging golden retriever, where after telling the audience about how he’s growing older, Smiley’s owner asks her son if the dog will live forever, and he naively responds yes. Digitally, perhaps. Smiley in some large way reminds me of my childhood dog Patrick, quickly becoming the accidental mascot of this section, and though this was something I learned long after he’d passed, Patrick taught me the value of morality.

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[Applied Psychology] No Tail Pullin’!

Most “nice” people seem so worried about offending others that they’re willing to get walked over to avoid any conflict before exploding in uncontrolled anger. I’ve been guilty of that. In recent years especially, I’ve been trying to improve, so I’ve been thinking about how to hold true to your beliefs while adapting to the world. Taking a lesson from my childhood dog Patrick, I think I’ve found the middle ground.

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