[Media Meandry] Endless War’s End?

The ENDLESS WAR dream is over. I joined the Discord MUD in April 2020, shortly after the nearly three-hour lecture dropped, [if we’re not counting how I dropped in late into 2018 as a silent nobody], which was right as the “dream” replays of seasons 1 and 2 started. Now that we’re well into season 3, let’s reflect on the Fibonacci sequence of complexity in each season and how each end invites itself to a new beginning. Losing reveals finding.

WANNA CONSIDER HOW YOU MIGHT SPEND DREAM TIME, BOTH IN-GAME AND OUT-OF-GAME? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!

[Media Meandry] Meander Through Trilogy

Now that I’ve played through the freely available Jill of the Jungle trilogy – a game I remember seeing, longingly, in childhood without being able to play because of, perhaps, timing – was it worth revisiting the past? Some meandries through the first game have been sufficient to itch the nostalgia scratch, although from a completionist’s perspective, leaving the others unplayed would have left me yearning for more. It was worth visiting, but revisiting? Probably not.

Rating: ★★★☆☆ [3/5]
WANNA CONSIDER WHETHER JILL OF THE JUNGLE IS WORTH VISITING NOW? AND HOW IT COULD BE EDITED FOR QUALITY? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!

[Videogame Review] Endless War

ENDLESS WAR is a Discord MUD. It’s also an intimidating concept, even with a guide and contextual lecture explaining the lore. This essay intends to introduce a non-player of the game to it, so that although you won’t be an expert, you will at least know some of the fundamentals. The high skill floor, perhaps, might be part of the appeal. Since playing, however, I’ve found it deeply meditative and worth sharing with other people.

WANNA READ AN INTRODUCTION INTO A COOL GAME WITH AN INSPIRATIONAL CONCLUSION? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!

[Media Meandry] Picking Up Steam

For years, I’ve struggled with ways to balance my vocational work, my avocational work [writing], and my leisurely time. For years, that meant never actually taking much time to play games, relax, or do anything that would help me release steam. I’ve made attempts, through writing, over the years. One such experiment was allowing myself thirty-minute time slots to play games, if I wrote pithy reviews. Those reviews weren’t great, but the thought was good.

WANNA CONSIDER YOU SHOULD BLOW OFF STEAM TO PREVENT BURN-OUT? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!

[Videogame Review] Minit (2018, Steam)

Minit celebrates your successes. In life, we often waste so much time tackling trivial things that we arrive at the end of the day without much to show for it. Maybe we’re scared to try and fail? In Minit, you’re given unlimited times to try and fail at overcoming obstacles, yet it forgives the negatives and only remembers the positives. Through stylish presentation and intuitive gameplay mechanics, Minit could possibly inspire lasting time management impressions.

Rating: ★★★★★ [5/5]
WANNA READ A VIDEOGAME REVIEW WITH A LOOSE THEME OF TIME MANAGEMENT? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!

[Videogame Review] Shonen Idle Z (Steam)

My alarm would go off. Rather than go back to sleep, I’d jump on the computer to run through my Shonen Idle Z timers. I beat the game after 5 months of letting the idle game run in the background for nearly 1,000 hours. It’s a pretty game in a low-impact, somewhat trivial, genre. Doesn’t that mean it’s functionally useless and valueless? Why not play a more rewarding game? It can teach one big lesson about motivation.

Mechanics Rating: ★★★☆☆ [3/5]
Discipline potential: ★★★★☆ [4/5]
WANNA LEARN ABOUT SOME INCIDENTAL MOTIVATION? KEEP ON READING!

[Videogame Review] Else Heart.Break() (Steam)

The premise is clear within thirty seconds of the trailer for Else Heart.Break(): you’re gonna program some cool stuff! Subtly learning basic programming while modifying a future retro game world? Groovy! Within seven hours of gameplay, however, the execution failed to deliver even a hint of premise, which is unfortunate because with some modification this could have been a great edutainment videogame. This was most “programming” I was able to do:

Are you sure? y/n what?
OK, can’t blame you.
_

Continue reading →