[Applied Psychology] Those Awkward Spots

Don’t let lulls in conversation overwhelm you. Most are innocent enough. You’re conversing, the topic runs out, then there’s what feels like an awkward silence that needs to be filled with any noise, so you might rush to fill the air with any topic you can think of immediately. Don’t! Let conversations rest and breathe. In less innocent conversations, like negotiation or dealing with manipulative individuals, filling air superfluously will put you at a disadvantage.

WANNA USE PAUSES TO YOUR ADVANTAGE? KEEP ON READING!

[Blah Blah] Troubleshooting Coproductive Overanalyses

Working solo allows you the complete freedom to make projects exactly as you please. Team projects still allow comfortable freedom. It’s just you trade absolute authority for coproductive collaboration. Teammates might have skills you don’t have or haven’t learned, while others have skills that can help develop your potential. Within the Blah Blah group, some can program, while others were helping troubleshoot narrative aspects of the Story Mode so we can deliver a better project:

Spoiler Warning Scale: None (story development)
Maturity warning: safe reading, folks
WANNA BROADLY CONSIDER HOW PROJECTS CAN DEVELOP DIFFERENTLY IN TEAMS? KEEP ON READING!

[Applied Psychology] Appeasing the Technojunkies

“Let’s make a list of everything that’s been happening. We’ll iron the issues out one-by-one.” “Let me just tell you the truth. This thing is a piece of…” That’s my cue that the issue is not technical. We aren’t troubleshooting a technical issue, per se, instead I’ve stepped into the role of therapist helping ease the technojunkie’s technological anxiety. Without getting into specifics, here are five strategies I’ve used to talk people off their cliffs.

WANNA READ STRATEGIES FOR CALMING DOWN IN THE FACE OF EMOTIONLESS TECHNOLOGY? KEEP ON READING!

[The Story] Overcoming Difficult Problems

In last week’s brainstorming update to “The Story,” I covered how main characters Trishna and John (left) would clash. Even the most connected people clash, after all, especially when both are fiercely independent. It’s about balance: if one is more comfortable jumping into the fray than thoroughly researching, let them perform their strengths to build a more cohesive team. Let’s see how they solve problems, and how teams solve problems, in this Applied Psychology crossover:

Spoiler Warning Scale: None! (just brainstorming)
WANNA READ MORE ANALOGIES FOR CONFLICT RESOLUTION? KEEP ON READING!

[Applied Psychology] Stop Overanalyzing Situations

Over analysis leads to analysis paralysis.” The main problem with overanalyzing is that you don’t realize when you’re already sinking into analysis paralysis. In moderation, analysis is a fundamental tool in self-development, helping you prevent repeating similar mistakes. It’s just that we’re too critical of ourselves, often to the point of being critical before we even receive that missing piece of information to complete the analysis feedback loop. One quote helps me mute that noise:

WANNA PRACTICE REDUCING THE AMOUNT OF THOUGHT YOU PUT INTO HYPOTHETICALS? KEEP ON READING!

[Rowing Machine] 246 > 0

Compared to last week when I obliterated my anaerobic times, I ramped down. I could blame external frustrations like a float tank session leaving me uncharacteristically stiff, dealing with bad newsfeeling ill, or prioritizing my time in the mostly sedentary sport of writing. It’s good to acknowledge those excuses. It’s better to prevent excuses from reaching your goals. Dust them off, like my rowing machine below, and let’s brainstorm some ideas to get back to it!

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[Applied Psychology] Overcoming Bad News

The best way to overcome bad news is to sit down with the problem, brainstorm myriad possible solutions, and try some out. The scientific method, basically. It’s just too bad that doesn’t usually happen, since as human beings full of conflicting emotions that almost actively reject logic and reason, we tend to get so hung up on that one problem that it permeates every facet of our lives preventing us from shifting gears into solution mode. Why?

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