[The Story] Character-Building: Elevator Pitch

I don’t like the idea of saying a character has this particular personality trait or that way of thinking. For me, that feels overly-simplistic. Sure, we can make those assumptions, but it takes seeing how people and characters act and react to situations that help us determine their character. This only marginally relates to “The Story,” but I came up with an idea to figure out your character’s/characters’s personality/personalities: An elevator pitch, if you will.

Spoilers?: Minor [a what-if scenario]
WANNA CONSIDER HOW IT’S BETTER TO NOT ASSIGN ARBITRARY TRAITS TO CHARACTER OR PEOPLE, BUT RATHER SURMISE THESE TRAITS FROM SITUATIONS? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!

[Media Meandry] Main And Sides

There comes a time when you must be decisive. Whether in life, Pokémon LeafGreen, or writing novels, decisiveness comes from trimming the fat that stands between you and your priorities. In this session, I trimmed my team down, benching as many as I could, and I’m down to 13 viable candidates to battle the Elite Four. In life, similarly, you should focus your energy on your main objectives. What about building side characters in your fiction?

WANNA READ THE JUICY FAT ON CHARACTER BUILDING INDIRECTLY OR DIRECTLY? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!

[The Story] Considering Chronic Pain

Many people deal with chronic pain. Do the main characters of “The Story,” John and Trishna, have any long-term medical malaises? As I considered this question, briefly thinking through disparate scenes that might appear across the short stories, novel, or series of novels encapsulated within the greater whole of the Eville landscape where my first and other novels will reside, my casual answer is no. They will have some flirtations with pain, like everyone does…

Spoilers?: Minor [considering character-building concepts]
WANNA CONSIDER BENEFITS AND DRAWBACKS TO HAVING CHARACTERS BE LIKE OR UNLIKE YOU? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!

[The Story] Differentiations From Norm

Genericized ideas within traditional storytelling are popular because it’s easy to understand certain concepts. These concepts may be fairly straightforward, and flavoring differentiations from the norm are what really makes the characters different and unique. Who remembers characters that are exactly like every other? However, when characters are too far away from the norm, then how can they be easily accessible? And within that spectrum, where do John and Trishna in “The Story” fit in?

Spoilers?: Minor (building characters… non-organically?)
WANNA CONSIDER HOW A 20% DIFFERENTIATION FROM A 80% NORM MIGHT BE ONE WAY TO GO? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!

[The Story] Attending The Symphony

“I might try to sneak in on my break.[1]” “I’m sure they wouldn’t mind…[2]” How often have you heard about college students trying to sneak into a classical music performance? Let alone… attend? In “The Story,” John and Trishna are more likely to go to punk shows, and since classical music and rock music don’t often collide, what might inspire them to dress up to attend a more traditional symphony orchestra performance in downtown Eville?

Spoilers?: Minor (situational character building)
WANNA CONSIDER HOW THROWING YOUR CHARACTERS INTO WEIRD SITUATIONS MIGHT RESULT IN COOL IDEAS? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!

[Series Review] Golden Kamuy (2018)

Let’s say you’ve got ten minutes to catch the bus and you’re nearly there. Why not enjoy a leisurely scenery-soaked stroll? Golden Kamuy is like that stroll, or, like an action-oriented Mushishi. We follow a motley cadre of characters searching for gold throughout 1900s Hokkaido. Our main character, “the Immortal” Sugimoto, leisurely learns about Ainu culture during his gold-oriented stroll and we, too, learn about the malignment and mystery of Ainu through this sundry stroll.

Rating: ★★★★☆ [4/5]
Spoilers?: Nothing significant (general commentary)
WANNA CONSIDER HOW HISTORY CAN BE BROUGHT TO LIFE IN ENGAGING WAYS? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!