[The Story] Different Than Me

Can we truly write any character without referring, even tangentially, to personal or professional experience? No matter how fantastic, bizarre, or false a character’s actions may seem to us, they are still rooted in some level of perception of our reality. Even filtered post-collaboration, most characters still represent certain unshakeable authorial archetypes of personality. Let’s explore how similar John [center] and Trishna [right] might be to me as their character arcs develop in “The Story.”

Spoilers?: Minor (character development/exploration)
WANNA CONSIDER HOW ORIGINAL CHARACTERS ARE LIKE MOONS ORBITING THE GRAVITY FIELDS OF EXISTING CHARACTER PLANETS…? OR WAS THAT TOO ABSTRACT? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!

[The Story] Interpreting Personality Tests

Personality tests are fun pseudo-scientific sociology exercises to help people explain themselves to others. I can empathize with a few. Their major problem is that they restrict each tester into a personality box where they are only their test result. In this week’s update to “The Story,” along with a casual Applied Psychology entry, let’s explore why. I’ll use the main characters John and Trishna as examples, factoring in the psychological importance of “breaking character.”

WANNA THINK ABOUT HOW WE PLACE OURSELVES AND CHARACTERS INTO STERILE PERSONALITY BOXES? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!