[Media Meandry] Ben’s Van Crew

The idea popped into my head with such force that it needed to exist. When writing, I usually explore enigmas or posit positions. When drawing, however, it’s usually because there’s an idea that took hold of my mind and won’t let go until I draw it to realization. During the ENDLESS WAR Kickstarter, some of us joked about how the Kickstarter was a fundraiser to repair a fictional van, so I took to drawing that.

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[Media Meandry] Keep Your Hands Off Eizouken!, Episode 3 [2020]

While covering episodes 1 and 2 of currently-airing anime Keep Your Hands Off Eizouken!, I wrote meandry academic thoughts between screenshots in a gallery experiment. Although an exceedingly fun and clever show, with moderately deep characters and creative artistic flourishes, I’m not the most qualified to academically study it. Instead, let’s meander over an idea from the episode. How does someone make and complete a project, fulfilling and profitable, under what might seem like an impossible deadline?

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[2019 Novel] Scope of Work

Writing isn’t this mysterious thing. We over-complicate the whole process maybe out of a sense of wanting the whole experience to be more magical than it really is. The writing process is merely getting from the beginning of the idea to the end of the idea. If you don’t have the idea fully formed, you can’t write to it. Let’s consider some generic scoping for planning any project, then explore how I’ll scope this “2019 novel.”

WANNA DROP THE PRETENTIONS, GET TO PLANNING, AND EXECUTE ON YOUR IDEAS? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!

[Series Review] New Game! (2016-17)

There’s a gag in New Game!, a cute-girls-doing-cute-things anime about videogame development, where director Shizuku (right) presents whimsically unreasonable change requests to chief programmer Umiko (center). It’s amusing, until you’ve worked enough gigs where customers innocently request major changes even after deadline. Then, you empathize with Umiko. Some adjustments are fine. When seemingly-innocent requests actually require extensive researchdev-time, and rewrites, the customer isn’t always right. Showing these career nuances makes watching New Game! worthwhile.

Season 1: ★★★★☆ [4/5]
Season 2: ★★★☆☆ [3/5]
(Highlight to reveal spoilers: Like this!)
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