[Media Meandry] Balance With Imbalance

I’ve been thinking about balance lately. I define balance as keeping multiple responsibilities, tasks, hobbies, and personas equalized. None should carelessly take priority over another in a priority hierarchy. After the broadcast I did yesterday, where I talked about some numbers, I rolled around this idea about how some broadcasters I’ve encountered are only after their numbers. So I said something. If this makes my broadcasting persona less popular, there are still myriad other personas.

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[Semi-Interactive Podcast] 6, Gamedev, Anxiety

Games seem easy to make, but they’re surprisingly complicated. Today, I talked with two people on the Semi-Interactive Podcast, Episode 6, about game development. Through our conversation, we talked about everything from suggestions on making videogames to how videogames are made to the stresses of dealing with making videogames. It was a hearty conversation that has many applications from game development to other fields in life and I’m happy with how the podcasts are going now.

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[The Story] A Spoonie’s Greenhouse

About a year and a half ago now, I had imagined wanting to augment the written word portions of “The Story” with small, contained videogames. I had first considered the idea after seeing stories told in 48-hour game jam games, and thought, why not try? It’s been over a year since I last dug into that idea seriously, but it’s not a failure, because its seeds still were able to flower into reasonable storytelling ideas.

Spoilers?: Minor [developing one setting]
WANNA CONSIDER HOW PRACTICING A NON-WRITING SKILL CAN HELP WITH YOUR WRITING, PERHAPS? CLICK HERE TO KEEP ON READING!

[Series Review] New Game! (2016-17)

There’s a gag in New Game!, a cute-girls-doing-cute-things anime about videogame development, where director Shizuku (right) presents whimsically unreasonable change requests to chief programmer Umiko (center). It’s amusing, until you’ve worked enough gigs where customers innocently request major changes even after deadline. Then, you empathize with Umiko. Some adjustments are fine. When seemingly-innocent requests actually require extensive researchdev-time, and rewrites, the customer isn’t always right. Showing these career nuances makes watching New Game! worthwhile.

Season 1: ★★★★☆ [4/5]
Season 2: ★★★☆☆ [3/5]
(Highlight to reveal spoilers: Like this!)
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