[The Story] Developing Worlds Logically

“I have a question for you.” “…I have an answer for you![1, 2]” From here, we built a world, the details of which should not matter here besides to refresh my memories as being a nice conversation. What is important is starting off with the biggest details: What do you want this world to be like? Is it X meets Y? From there, tell me who inhabits this world. I’ll tell you who inhabits “The Story.”

Spoilers?: None (just wandering world-exploring)

Basically everyone on Earth, mostly.

From there, what are the major economic or social structures? How do they live? How are their daily lives? What do they do for fun? Do they get days off? Do they have work schedules? When do they get paid? What currency? Who controls and confirms the currency? How are the currencies spent? Do they buy anything worthless?

“The Story” functions much like Earth.

Depending on the answers to the questions above, with elaborate examples for each, we can then start to deduce what actually needs to happen: research. If a town in this world had X, Y, and Z factors, how well do you know these factors? How thoroughly can you study these factors and relate them to your personal experiences? Can you visit these places?

I visit “The Story” a myriad times daily.

Can you let these ideas stew for a while? If the world is viable, you can return to it in your imagination frequently from different emotional and logical perspectives. Can you find other examples in fiction or real life that relate with your world? How close or far do you want this to be to reality?

“The Story” is essentially an ambiguous amalgamation.

Can you immerse yourself in this world? What colors are the floors of a particular building that a character might typically find themselves in? Are these characters human, human-like, or something else? How do they maintain their abodes, roads, or commodes? Can you taste the air upon which a character might notice upon entering any particular location?

“The Story” may have all of this, or may not.

The specifics aren’t important. These are just some of the millions of questions you can ask of your world as you build it. Sometimes, an answer will lift you up, force your research into a particular area, or shatter your expectations. Are these things you want to consider? If not, don’t go into this level of detail. The world might just be your perception of reality tinged with the bias of your world view, and maybe these details aren’t terribly important.

“The Story” won’t have custom physics engines.

To reiterate, most of “The Story” will be our own, or how I perceive our world to be, with my commentary sprinkled throughout. I have no interest in learning about esoteric concepts within architecture to differentiate it from our world. Does your world require that?

What is the point of your world?

How does it impress or depress your characters?

In “The Story,” John and Trishna define their own process.

Endtable:
Quotes: [1, 2] An acquaintance in an area that knew me as a writer.
Sources: The Story’s Imaginarium.
Inspirations: The event was helpful for my acquaintance, so I wanted to apply the same sort of logic in writing, so maybe it will be helpful for other people?
Related: Essays building “The Story.”
Photo: I used to have some plants that I named John and Trishna, but after they appeared to be dying, I decided to return the plants/gift, and replace them with their non-simulacrum representations. I don’t know when and if I’ll be returning to LEGO photography. After my Downsizing Zeal project is complete, at the earliest, so why not present them front and center, instead of keeping them hidden away somewhere?
Written On: April 13th [27 minutes]
Last Edited: Some edits on May 22nd, otherwise – first draft; final draft for the Internet.
My big goal is to write. My important goal is to write "The Story." My proudest moment is the most recent time I overcame a fear, which should have been today. I'm a better zombie than I was yesterday. Let's strive to be better everyday. (Avatar)